Posts Tagged ‘Open Knowledge Foundation’

Here are the videos from the Data Journalism stream at the Open Knowledge Conference this year held in Berlin featuring Mirko Lorenz, Simon Rogers and Caelainn Barr amongst others.

And just so you know I will be heading back to Berlin at the end of September for the Knight-Mozilla Hackathon. Greatly looking forward to it as I’ll be getting hands on experience of platforming building for the news quick and dirty. I’m also very excited about meeting some of the lab folk face to face. Will keep you posted and blog from a journo perspective and how I think this type of creativity is changing news.


Open Knowledge Foundation


‘Open’ knowledge is any material – whether content, data or general information – which anyone is free to use, re-use and redistribute without restriction. They promote the creation, dissemination and use of open knowledge in all its forms, from genes to geodata, sonnets to statistics.


Thursday 30th June – Friday 1st July, all day


Johannisstr. 2,
10117 Berlin,
Germany (see map)


All the big names in Open Data will be there with tracks including ‘Data Journalism: What Next?‘ and ‘Open Data in the newsroom: How should a workflow for data-journalist look like?‘. There will be hands on workshops that whole week with hands-on scraping via ScraperWiki. Sign up here.

#opendata from Open Knowledge Foundation on Vimeo.

You might be wondering what this short documentary has to do with journalism or even what open data has to do with journalism. No doubt you are aware that journalism has been facing a ‘crisis’ for a while now. Not just because of the recession and shrinking advertisers but because of the dominance of the web for getting information to people and allowing them to share amongst themselves.

Open data activists are working with the web to provide information in a way people can engage with and ultimately feel empowered by. Projects like FixMyStreet and Schooloscope are emblematic of this rise in civic engagement projects. Indeed, crime mapping in San Francisco led to local citizens demanding more policing in areas of high crime and a change in the policing schedule to reflect the hours when crime is at its highest.

News used to have some responsibility in this area of engagement but never quite understood the field or didn’t know quite what to do with it. Now they have lost complete control and the masters of the web platforms are again taking informational control of a growing area of interest. But news organizations are missing a very important trick. Data driven journalist, Mirko Lorenz, has written how News organizations must become hubs of trusted data in a market seeking (and valuing) trust.

Which is why I think anyone interested in the area of data journalism should watch this documentary, as not only should traditional media be training journalists to engage with this new streaming of social and civic data, but managers and execs should think about the possible shifting in the traditional media market away from advertising and towards the trust market.